Chapter Six: §6

(Continued)
Gesula, Lenyol

The sun set as Toran and Tàvae worked. They had made good progress transcribing the smuggled text, for though it appeared thick, its heavily decorated borders meant each page contained only a few hundred words.

Continue reading “Chapter Six: §6”

Chapter Five: §2

Winter – 1023 YD
Delus, Miggest

Two fires burnt on opposing walls of Delus Palace’s Great Hall, yet they barely took the edge from the deep chill of late winter. The Custodia stood before one of the fireplaces, her High Counsellor and High Commander by her side. Her face was grave indeed.
__‘How many were killed?’
__‘Four, Your Majesty. Three men and a boy.’
__She felt her throat constrict. ‘And the age of the boy?’ Continue reading “Chapter Five: §2”

Chapter Four: §4

December, 1022 YD
Lirna, Lenyol

Princess Régan arrived at Lirna Palace in the evening, four days after departing the capital. The journey had been hot and rough, and she was relieved to be received by the Duchess in the outer gardens. The Princess alighted the carriage; the Duchess, Lady Ione, took the Princess’ arm and guided her inside, along a series of beautiful staircases into to the Dining Hall. It was cool, set with a fine meal, and free from servants.

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Chapter Four: §3

(Continued)
Gesula, Lenyol

January drew to a close, and Kesia’s fifteenth birthday passed. Toran arrived one evening with a confusing account of the day’s events.
__The main text Toran laboured over was one of history—a dense volume written in an academic form of Gaeilge, made more difficult to decipher by its calligraphic script. It was, however, very beautiful. Writ on vellum, covered with gold-plated metal, and with ornately decorated borders, it seemed as ancient as the time it recorded: the era before the accession of the Dragon Monarchs, and the first century of their reign. It was his task to transcribe it onto parchment, translating what he could alongside. For weeks he copied the names of long-departed tribes, their territories, sacred places, and Chieftains; few dates accompanied these records, and their regions were unlisted. He constantly scoured the modern maps with faint hope of locating the areas mentioned—for the new tongue had given new names to these old places. His treasured bilingual dictionary was wearing from use. Yet his efforts were rewarded with insights into a forgotten time.

Continue reading “Chapter Four: §3”

Chapter Three: §2

(Continued)
Offenure Castle, Lenyol

‘Régan!’ Custodin Màtac opened his arms to the closing doors and smiled. ‘I am pleased you could join us.’
   The Princess stood stiffly by the entry to the Dining Hall. She pushed her lips into a smile and walked slowly to the dining table, mahogany gown draping behind. ‘Thank you for sending mother; I must be reminded to eat at times.’
   Bridget ducked her head, receiving her daughter’s gratitude with as much sincerity as was given, and took her seat. The Custodin and Princess did the same, and pleasantries were exchanged. Continue reading “Chapter Three: §2”

Chapter Three: The Castle §1

December – 1022 YD
Offenure Castle, Lenyol

‘Régan?’ Royal Consort Bridget called for her daughter. ‘Régan?’
    Princess Régan flinched, waving her lady’s maid to the doors. The servant went quickly to them, pressing her weight against the heavy oak, admitting herself to the hall. ‘Your Royal Highness,’ she curtseyed, ‘the Princess is a little indisposed, though she is pleased to receive—’ the Consort brushed past— ‘you.’ Crimson, the poor maid laboured with the handle to close the door.
   ‘I am bathing, Mother,’ the Princess stated, keeping her back turned. ‘Perhaps you could leave me in peace?’ Continue reading “Chapter Three: The Castle §1”

Chapter Two: §5

Spring – 1022 YD
Tenenum Temple, Miggest

The Duke of Edeen rewarded Sevína’s guidance with ample coin. She had relinquished her initial offence at offer of payment when news came that the drought was taking its first victims in the north. The gold she gave to Tenenum Temple, as protection for the adherents and children. Winter had brought little rain and crops continued to fail.
__Offerings came daily to the temples. Perhaps, as some whispered, penance was due for waning worship. The Black Dragon would accept their suffering as atonement, and deliver rain—in autumn—in winter—in spring? Continue reading “Chapter Two: §5”